Archive for September, 2010

The Zirbelstube sauna at Therme Erding near Munich

Patrons enjoying a beer in the 55 C Zierbelstube sauna at the Munich area Therme Erding

Late September to early October means one thing to residents of Munich: The Oktoberfest, where nearly 6 million people consume more than 6.5 million liters of beer during the 15-day celebration. If you over-imbibed it the night before, or for people looking for a place to wash off the jet lag or just get away from the crowds, Munich offers a refuge: Its sauna baths.

Germany has thousands of public saunas, ranging from small add-ons to a hotel fitness room to bathing related theme parks. For the price of 1 to 3 Maß, you can spend the day lounging and sweating away your stresses or hangover. (There is some debate about the effectiveness of using a sauna as a hangover cure. I’ve always found it effective.)

If you’ve never been to a sauna in Germany before, see our related posts about what to expect, what is an Aufguss and how to sauna like a German.

Oktoberfest began in 1810 as a wedding party for a Bavarian Crown Prince. The party has been a good one, because it’s still going.  It’s been celebrated for 177 of the last 200 years. It was originally celebrated in mid-October, but festival organizers have moved up the date to take advantage of the warmer weather in late September.

If you want to get started, here are the Munich area saunas from our database:

 
Postillonstraße 17
MunichGermany
European
Mixed GendersNude
 
Terminalstrasse Mitte 20
MunichGermany
European
Seperate AreasNude
 
Mathildenstrasse 5
MunichGermany
Hammam
Mixed GendersNude
 
Rosenheimer Strasse 1
MunichGermany
European
Mixed GendersNude
 
Schleißheimer Straße 142
MunichGermany
European
Mixed GendersNude
 
Coubertinplatz 1
MunichGermany
European
Mixed GendersNude
 
Thermenallee 4
ErdingGermany
European Hot Springs
Mixed GendersNude


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Frustration (was: threesixtyfive | day 244)

Photo by Stybren Stüvel on Flickr

We know this has nothing to do with saunas, but its occupied much of our time for the last few weeks, and has caused a few days of downtime here. You may be experiencing similar problems, so we’d thought we’d share this.

This site is powered by WordPress. Since upgrading to the current version (3.0.1) we’ve had issues with memory. Specifically, we’ve been getting errors “Allowed memory size of 33554433 bytes exhausted.” We first started seeing them on the admin dashboard, then on some of the other admin pages, then on a few of the public pages. Then it took down the whole site one weekend.

Anyway, we’ve spent a lot of time digging through the WordPress support forums, enabling and disabling plugins, and generally banging our heads against the wall. We finally found it.

Here is our solution:

  1. Upgrade WordPress and all your plugins to the current version first. Disable any you can’t live without. To get this site back online, we had to ftp in and delete a few non-critical plugins that were way out of date.
  2. Install and activate the TPC! Memory Usage plugin by Webjawns. This makes the troubleshooting process easier.
  3. On the Memory Usage Overview that TPC puts at the bottom of  your admin dashboard, look at the WP Memory Limit and the PHP Memory Limit. Both of these were set to “32M” on this site. Since version 2.8, WordPress really wants 64M. Memory usage was at more than 90%  (WordPress wanted to use more, but couldn’t. This was the cause of the errors.)
  4. To increase the WP Memory Limit, edit your wp-config.php file and search for a line like this and make sure the number before the last ‘M’ is 64 (or 128):
    define(’WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’, ’64M’);
    If you can’t find it, add it up near the other define statements towards the top of the file.
  5. To increase your PHP Memory limit (you have to do both), you need to edit or add a php.ini file. On our host (PolurNet), we had to create it in the wp-admin directory. We tried other locations first, and it didn’t work. Ours has only this line:
    memory_limit = 64M
    Where this php.ini file has to reside and if you can edit it varies from host to host. You’ll need to speak with your hosing company’s tech support for exact instructions.
  6. Go back and re-install or re-enable your plugins. Watch to see if any of them are especially large memory hogs as you do so.

All right. Time to take off the propeller beanie and get back to the sauna.

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New Poll: Would you be photographed, naked in a sauna, for publication? http://sodahead.com/poll/1250841/

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